History & Press

Article: Bend Bulletin August 30, 2011 —

A sweet alternative in a cowboy town
Angeline’s Bakery continues to bring new food ideas to Sisters

By Jordan Novet / The Bulletin
August 30. 2011

Angeline Rhett, owner of Angeline’s Bakery, started her Sisters business from a red wooden wagon in the mid-1990s.

The basics:
What: Angeline’s Bakery LLC
Where: 121 W. Main St., Sisters
Employees: 12
Website: http://angelinesbakery.com
Phone: 541-549-9122

SISTERS — Angeline Rhett moved here from Portland in 1995 to fight fires. When the fire season ended, she decided to stick around, and she needed money to live.

The best idea she could think of? Making food from scratch — something she had enjoyed doing while growing up in Portland — and selling it on an informal basis.

She connected with the owner of Northern Lights Bakery, which occupied the space Angeline’s now owns, on West Main Avenue in Sisters, and arranged to make her own sandwiches and bake cookies in the bakery’s kitchen. She sold her goods throughout Sisters from a red wooden wagon.

It was a primitive operation, but it was a start.

In 1996, Rhett bought Northern Lights’ assets and took over the business and the entire space early in 1997. When it came time to make new signs a year or two later, she changed the name to Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe.

Rhett, now 42, said her business has adapted to better fit her life in the 16 years she has owned it. Her role in the bakery has waxed and waned to accommodate changes such as having children. And, now that they’re older, she said she is back to full-time work, sometimes getting up at 4 a.m. to bake and at other times going in late to roll bagels.

Instead of acting on market trends or even information from her customers, Rhett has followed her own passions to make decisions about what she makes and sells.

Over the years, Rhett has become involved in gluten-free baking, making products without sugar, eating raw foods and blending smoothies made from vegetables grown in her More…

Wheatgrass Juice: Superfood or Superhype? —


Wheatgrass Juice: Superfood or Superhype?
Sep 07, 2011
by Jeff Spry CBN Feature Writer

Angeline Rhett, owner of Angeline’s Bakery in downtown Sisters, knows a thing or two about healthful eating. Her delicious gluten-free and vegan baked goods that vanish from the display cases faster than you can say Jack LaLanne are created with the finest natural ingredients with a concerned eye toward improving ones lifestyle through good food.

A new item to the menu, though certainly not new in the universe of health foods, is Liquid Sunshine Wheatgrass, which can be bought as frozen take-home cubes or blended into green drinks and fruit smoothies. Often labeled Nature’s Finest Medicine, the Nectar Of Rejuvenation or The Blood Of All Life, wheatgrass is enjoying a rising popularity in the diets of people trying to gain an extra edge on the ravages of time and aging.

“You drink it, you feel it,” she said. “I don’t do well with the big claims of other supplements or vitamins but this is the real thing. It’s truly amazing, it restores your enzymes and feeds your body in a way the standard American diet can’t provide. The more you add it, the more benefits you see.”

The medicinal properties of wheatgrass and its energizing boost to the cellular system, anti-aging and overall wellness can’t be ignored. Wheatgrass is basically a baby wheat plant which has been cultivated and marketed for its nutritional health benefits.

Served juiced or powdered, this amazing superfood is packed with chlorophyll, vitamins and amino acids in high concentrations for maximum absorption and effect. The trick is to harvest the young wheatgrass at the exact point in its lifecycle at which nutrients are at their peak potency. Advocates of the miracle greens endorse it as a means to better digestion, increased energy, a preventative tonic for cancer, diabetes and a body detoxifier. Wheatgrass juice has also been proven to build red blood cells quickly after ingestion. It contains up to 70 percent chlorophyll, and the chlorophyll molecule is nearly identical to hemin, the central pigment in our blood.

“You can see the glow in people’s faces who are on it,” said Rhett. “You’re nourishing your body with things that are alive instead of dead. My job here at the bakery is to make people excited about whole foods, vegan eating and juicing. I want it to be fun and exciting and creative. To let people take their health in their own hands is a powerful transformation. The more people you get turned on, the more they’ll pass it on.” More…

Plenty to see and hear at Angeline’s Bakery —

bendbulletin.com The Bulletin

Plenty to see and hear at Angeline’s Bakery

 

Published: August 19. 2011 4:00AM PST

This is the busiest week all summer at Angeline’s Bakery (121 W. Main St., Sisters), so let’s dive right in … after I tell you these shows all start at or around 7 p.m.

• Tonight, longtime local fave Dennis McGregor will take to the stage in Angeline’s back yard. McGregor is probably best known for his More…

A Little Slice of Heaven —

A Little Slice of Heaven image

A Little Slice of Heaven — Angeline’s Bakery is a good, healthy value
by John Gottberg Anderson
(The Bend Bulletin, Restaurant Review, January 11, 2008)

Angeline Rhett was in her mid-20s when she came to Sisters from Portland in the summer of 1995 to fight fires. Somewhere along the way, she said, “I forgot to save money and found myself broke in a very small town.”

So she leased a spot in the tiny Northern Lights Bakery (one block down and across the street from its current location) and began delivering lunches to local shop merchants. The following year, the bakery owner decided to leave town and offered the business to Rhett (then Angeline Agre). “I figured, ‘Sure, how hard could it be?’” Rhett recalled. More…